The Inlander

March 2018

Digital Edition of the Inland Press Association. Offering financial research, salary compensation survey, training for advertising, classifieds, editorial, circulation, social media, human resources, special sections and niche products.

Issue link: http://www.ifoldsflip.com/i/946731

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POWER UP YOUR USER ENGAGEMENT Better content, software, design, ideas, outsourcing and training With fewer reporters and editors and less original content, we have to make sure the content we do create is relevant and that readers read it. Better engagement in print and online can curb the impact of cutbacks and streamlining and grow readership and revenue. That's the new secret to success. And that's where Creative Circle can help. We know great content and design will prevail. Users have demonstrated that they will gravitate to the best user experiences. Unfortunately, most of what publishers and vendors do in print or online is rooted in the past, not the future. We set out to create the next gener- ation of print and web concepts for content, marketing and advertising. And we took some very different approaches. Here is a sampling of what we learned: Software must be easy and non-technical. If it's hard to use and technical, it's costing you money. Software should be democratic, allowing everyone to learn and manage. And true interactivity with users requires close attention to usability. This is a huge, hidden cost of most legacy software. Web sites must be dynamic, not static. Good design and flexible layouts make sites more interesting and engaging. Users stay longer. They click more. They read more. We created the industry's first dynamic web platform that allows you to alter the layout of web pages in seconds — add, subtract, move or package ads with related content, make a picture bigger. And we provide dozens of story layouts, or the ability to create your own. We created ways to package stories and run them together, just like you do in print. Better design and flexibility can drive your numbers (see chart) as long as it's easy to do, so demand that from your vendors. Pay walls can make money. While pay walls aren't for everyone, many of our clients have been surprised by how much cash they've been able to generate. And don't assume it has to be a metered model. There are a dozen pay wall approaches out there. We were the first to integrate a pay wall into our web CMS back in 2005 when everyone thought we were nuts. We now have the most flexible and easiest-to-use pay wall in the industry and we've seen a lot of different strategies work. Newsrooms and ad departments need to be much more user-focused. If you take a hard look at your workflows, you'll find they are literally anti-user. Learn to think like a user and reshape your company to act accordingly. It can give everyone on your team a new and hopeful outlook. Our energizing training programs can help refocus your newsroom and ad department to become truly user-centric. It's simple but revolutionary. Print isn't dead. So let's stop killing it. Print isn't a bad medium, we're just doing print badly. That's why print penetration has been dropping since 1945. Make print your premium product with only your best content. Add better headlines and more reader- centric coverage and you can grow newsstand sales, curb churn and boost circulation revenue. If you are willing to make a real commitment to change, our print redesigns can do just that. Reforming your content will improve every product you produce – in print and online. Top talent still matters. In this competitive envi- ronment, you've got to deliver top quality ideas, content and design. It's worth finding a way to keep your best talent. Ten talented people who are paid more will outperform 12 or 13 low paid staffers. Reinvest in training, too. If you need more help, we offer high-end creative outsourcing. We don't send work overseas to save money. We give you access to top talent who can deliver products that will make your clients and customers notice. Companies that invest in quality user experiences and relevant content will win. It's that simple. So if you need creative solutions, more engaged audiences, better software and new ideas, we should talk. Contact: Bill Ostendorf, president & founder, bill@ creativecirclemedia.com, 401-455-1555 or Sean Finch, VP/sales, sean@creativecirclemedia.com, 309-269-7834. This is what happened at The Taos News when they switched to Creative Circle's web platforms. Faster load times, better design and more dynamic layouts quickly and significantly grew their audience and engagement with readers. Creative Circle MEDIA SOLUTIONS . GOOD MORNING Wednesday March 1, 2017 Volume 96 - No. 184 johnsoncitypress.com Tri-Cities, Tennessee 75 cents Shelter plan? New volunteer group planned for Carter/6A Trump: Time to join forces to fix problems The AssociATed Press WASHINGTON — Heralding a "new chapter of American great- ness," President Donald Trump stood before Congress for the first time Tuesday night and issued a broad call for over- hauling the nation's health care system, significantly boosting military spending and plunging $1 trillion into upgrading crum- bling infrastructure. Striking an optimistic tone, Trump declared: "The time for small thinking is over." Trump's address came at a piv- otal moment for a new president elected on pledges to swiftly shake up Washington and follow through on the failed promises of career politicians. His opening weeks in office have been con- sumed by distractions and self-in- John Thompson/Johnson City Press Cheyanne Potter, left, and Brittany Widener finish a sign they made to honor fellow Hampton High School student Andrew Griner, who died last week. The symbol in the center is a 47, Andrew's favorite number, which he said stood for peace and balance. 'the best hugs' Hampton High students remember Andrew Griner's smile, his cheer and Woman arraigned in Erwin stabbing death Sessions Court Judge David Shults appointed the First Judicial District Office to represent conflict of interest in their represen- tation of Patrick and, absent any conflict, if she wishes to proceed preliminary hearing of the By sue Guinn LeGG Contributed/ Hampton High School Andrew Griner HAMPTON — Andrew Griner was with the senior class of Hampton High School for less than a year, but that was enough time to make friends with everyone. "He was always smiling, he was always there to cheer you up when you were down. He always gave you his shoulder to cry on. … He gave the best hugs," said one of his many friends, Cheyenne Potter. She said he called everyone in the school "fam" to signify he felt they were his family. His chief goal was to march across the stage when all the seniors got their diplomas in May. Memorials will honor senior who called everyone 'fam' By John ThomPson Elizabethton Bureau Chief jthompson@johnsoncitypress.com See HUGS, Page 2A Some couples need a ref. This one has two. Imagine this: You're in a public place with your wife. Suddenly a man begins yelling at her, saying mean and rude things, asking her if she's blind or something, and perhaps even worse. Then other people join in — some adults, some teenagers — and things get even louder. Do you spring to her defense? Do you whisk her away, and get her out of this situ- ation? If you're Jeff Fancher, you try to keep your cool. You wipe the sweat off your brow, and outwardly act as if nothing has hap- pened. What? Is chivalry dead? Well, for Jeff and his wife, Elexis, it's just Dave Ongie, Johnson City Press Elexis Fancher and her husband, Jeff, share a light moment during a break at a recent basketball game. By douGLAs FriTz Press Staff Writer dfritz@johnsoncitypress.com 'I have to put on a thicker skin when officiating with my wife, especially when the fans get personal.' — Jeff Fancher Married officiating team gets a look from the record book See REFS, Page 2A President Donald Trump addresses a joint session of Congress in Washing- ton Tuesday. The Associated Press Overtime thriller 'Toppers edge Jefferson Co./1B Wow. Just Crockett takes wild win over Boone/1B President calls for health care overhaul, big military spending increase See TRUMP, Page 2A 'Why not join forces to finally get the job done and get it done right?' — Donald Trump Blue Blood Brotherhood, a national organization dedicated to support current and retired law enforcement officers, is turning a Johnson City Super Bowl party into a fundraiser for Carter County Deputy Josh "Hoppy" Hopkins. Hopkins is best known as an Ashe County, North Carolina, deputy in the National Geographic Channel program "Southern Justice." While the reality television program featured Hopkins responding to many dangerous situations, one incident that was not part of the program occurred on July 8, 2015. That's when an incident led to a man's death and, eventually, a second-degree murder charge against Hopkins. GOOD MORNING Thursday October 5, 2017 Volume 97 - No. 37 johnsoncitypress.com Tri-Cities, Tennessee $1.00 Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B After Johnson City Board of Education members voted unanimously last month to continue studying a pro- posed transition from the current configuration of Indian Trail Intermediate School and Liberty Bell Middle School, the board wants feedback from the community. The board is considering turning each school into a middle school for students grades 5 through 8, which Superintendent Steve Barn- ett said could be beneficial City wants input on plans for two middle schools Falling student rolls 'They told us to get out' By Brandon Paykamian Press Staff Writer bpaykamian@johnsoncitypress.com Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B Eastman 'process upset' shakes neighbors, sends workers to shelter Kingsport Times-News Plumes rise from Wednesday's "pro- cess upset" at Eastman Chemical Co. By Jeff BoBo Kingsport Times-News KINGSPORT — Initially, Miranda Wood thought someone had crashed a vehicle into Johnny's Shoe Store on Eastman Road where she was working Wednesday morning, just a stone's throw from the Eastman Chemical Co. plant. In fact, the plant had been shaken Wednesday morning by explosions in the gasification area that were described by Eastman as "process upsets." When Wood realized what had really happened, she was quite upset indeed. "I heard two explosions, but it really sounded like somebody just hit the (Johnny's) building," Wood said. "My whole chair really did shake. ... As I came downstairs, it did smell like something was burning." Then she and other employees saw the plumes of smoke rising from the Eastman plant and they realized something serious had happened. "You better hold your breath," By Hank Hayes Kingsport Times-News KINGSPORT — This was not a test. Fifty-seven years to the day after a massive explosion and fire at Tennessee Eastman Co.'s Aniline plant killed 16 people and injured more than 400, Eastman Chemical had planned to test its hazardous vapor release alerting system Wednesday. But instead of the simple "acti- vation of Eastman's blue light alert and alarm systems" that was planned, in an odd coinci- dence a real-life "process upset" sent workers to safe havens and sent warnings to the giant plant's neighbors. "The gasifier blew up," an employee and eyewitness work- ing near the explosion told the Times-News. "They just made us run to our car and get out. They told us to get out." Eastman, in a prepared state- ment, explained what happened in an email: "Around 10 a.m., Eastman experienced a process upset in the coal gasification area of its Kingsport manufacturing See OUT, Page 3A Neighbors' concern grew when they saw plumes rise from plant See PLUMES, Page 2A JOHNSON CITY SCHOOLS Officials going school-to-school to find out what you think of the idea HAVE AN OPINION? Turn to Page 3A for a look at proposed configurations for Indian Trail and Liberty Bell and for the scheduled presentation dates and locations. See INPUT, Page 3A The 40th annual Unicoi County Apple Festival will run from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday and Saturday in downtown Erwin. In addition to the vast array of locally grown heir- loom and popular apple varieties the festival revolves around, fun activi - ties to look for include: • Blue Ridge Pottery Show and Sale The 38th annual Blue Ridge Pottery Show and Sale featuring dozens of vendors from across the country will be held from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, at Love Chapel Elementary School on Mohawk Drive. Shuttle service to and from the festival area will be available at the Clinchfield Senior Adult Center on Union Street. Admission is free. A preview sale with a $5 admission fee will be held from 5 p.m.-8 p.m. tonight school. Carrying on a regional tradition four decades old and more popular now than when they first took root in the 1970s, the National Storytelling Festival and Unicoi County Apple Festival return to the streets of Jonesborough and Erwin this weekend. The National Storytelling Festival kicks off Friday and wraps up Sunday, but there are still several pre-festival events shaking up the week before the fes- tivities in addition to a weekend packed with the best in storytelling. Festival lineups include: • Featured storytellers Nineteen featured story- tellers from around the world will line the program for the weekend. Listeners can sit in on festival favor- ites like Donald Davis and Jeanne Robertson and check out some of the new voices this year. New voices include Oba William King, who uses song and drum in his storytelling, and Anne Shimojima, who weaves her Asian heritage into her presentations like folk tales and the story of her Japanese American family's time in an incarceration camp during World War II. • Workshops for aspiring tellers If your taste is for apples or tales, this is your time of year By sue Guinn LeGG Press Staff Writer slegg@johnsoncitypress.com By Jessica fuLLer Press Staff Writer jfuller@johnsoncitypress.com Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A GOOD MORNING Thursday October 5, 2017 Volume 97 - No. 37 johnsoncitypress.com Tri-Cities, Tennessee $1.00 Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B After Johnson City Board of Education members voted unanimously last month to continue studying a pro- posed transition from the current configuration of Indian Trail Intermediate School and Liberty Bell Middle School, the board wants feedback from the community. The board is considering turning each school into a middle school for students grades 5 through 8, which Superintendent Steve Barn- ett said could be beneficial City wants input on plans for two middle schools Falling student rolls 'They told us to get out' By Brandon Paykamian Press Staff Writer bpaykamian@johnsoncitypress.com Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B Eastman 'process upset' shakes neighbors, sends workers to shelter Kingsport Times-News Plumes rise from Wednesday's "pro- cess upset" at Eastman Chemical Co. By Jeff BoBo Kingsport Times-News KINGSPORT — Initially, Miranda Wood thought someone had crashed a vehicle into Johnny's Shoe Store on Eastman Road where she was working Wednesday morning, just a stone's throw from the Eastman Chemical Co. plant. In fact, the plant had been shaken Wednesday morning by explosions in the gasification area that were described by Eastman as "process upsets." When Wood realized what had really happened, she was quite upset indeed. "I heard two explosions, but it really sounded like somebody just hit the (Johnny's) building," Wood said. "My whole chair really did shake. ... As I came downstairs, it did smell like something was burning." Then she and other employees saw the plumes of smoke rising from the Eastman plant and they realized something serious had happened. "You better hold your breath," By Hank Hayes Kingsport Times-News KINGSPORT — This was not a test. Fifty-seven years to the day after a massive explosion and fire at Tennessee Eastman Co.'s Aniline plant killed 16 people and injured more than 400, Eastman Chemical had planned to test its hazardous vapor release alerting system Wednesday. But instead of the simple "acti- vation of Eastman's blue light alert and alarm systems" that was planned, in an odd coinci- dence a real-life "process upset" sent workers to safe havens and sent warnings to the giant plant's neighbors. "The gasifier blew up," an employee and eyewitness work- ing near the explosion told the Times-News. "They just made us run to our car and get out. They told us to get out." Eastman, in a prepared state- ment, explained what happened in an email: "Around 10 a.m., Eastman experienced a process upset in the coal gasification area of its Kingsport manufacturing See OUT, Page 3A Neighbors' concern grew when they saw plumes rise from plant See PLUMES, Page 2A JOHNSON CITY SCHOOLS Officials going school-to-school to find out what you think of the idea HAVE AN OPINION? Turn to Page 3A for a look at proposed configurations for Indian Trail and Liberty Bell and for the scheduled presentation dates and locations. See INPUT, Page 3A The 40th annual Unicoi County Apple Festival will run from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday and Saturday in downtown Erwin. In addition to the vast array of locally grown heir- loom and popular apple varieties the festival revolves around, fun activi - ties to look for include: • Blue Ridge Pottery Show and Sale The 38th annual Blue Ridge Pottery Show and Sale featuring dozens of vendors from across the country will be held from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, at Love Chapel Elementary School on Mohawk Drive. Shuttle service to and from the festival area will be available at the Clinchfield Senior Adult Center on Union Street. Admission is free. A preview sale with a $5 admission fee will be held from 5 Carrying on a regional tradition four decades old and more popular now than when they first took root in the 1970s, the National Storytelling Festival and Unicoi County Apple Festival return to the streets of Jonesborough and Erwin this weekend. The National Storytelling Festival kicks off Friday and wraps up Sunday, but there are still several pre-festival events shaking up the week before the fes- tivities in addition to a weekend packed with the best in storytelling. Festival lineups include: • Featured storytellers Nineteen featured story- tellers from around the world will line the program for the weekend. Listeners can sit in on festival favor- ites like Donald Davis and Jeanne Robertson and check out some of the new voices this year. New voices include Oba William King, who uses song and drum in his storytelling, and Anne Shimojima, who weaves her Asian heritage into her presentations like folk tales and the story of her Japanese American family's time in an incarceration camp during World War II. for If your taste is for apples or tales, this is your time of year By sue Guinn LeGG Press Staff Writer slegg@johnsoncitypress.com By Jessica fuLLer Press Staff Writer jfuller@johnsoncitypress.com Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A GOOD MORNING Thursday October 5, 2017 Volume 97 - No. 37 johnsoncitypress.com Tri-Cities, Tennessee $1.00 Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B After Johnson City Board of Education members voted unanimously last month to continue studying a pro- posed transition from the current configuration of Indian Trail Intermediate School and Liberty Bell Middle School, the board wants feedback from the community. The board is considering turning each school into a middle school for students grades 5 through 8, which Superintendent Steve Barn- ett said could be beneficial City wants input on plans for two middle schools Falling student rolls call to study 'They told us to get out' By Brandon Paykamian Press Staff Writer bpaykamian@johnsoncitypress.com Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B Eastman 'process upset' shakes neighbors, sends workers to shelter Kingsport Times-News Plumes rise from Wednesday's "pro- cess upset" at Eastman Chemical Co. By Jeff BoBo Kingsport Times-News KINGSPORT — Initially, Miranda Wood thought someone had crashed a vehicle into Johnny's Shoe Store on Eastman Road where she was working Wednesday morning, just a stone's throw from the Eastman Chemical Co. plant. In fact, the plant had been shaken Wednesday morning by explosions in the gasification area that were described by Eastman as "process upsets." When Wood realized what had really happened, she was quite upset indeed. "I heard two explosions, but it really sounded like somebody just hit the (Johnny's) building," Wood said. "My whole chair really did shake. ... As I came downstairs, it did smell like something was burning." Then she and other employees saw the plumes of smoke rising from the Eastman plant and they realized something serious had happened. "You better hold your breath," By Hank Hayes Kingsport Times-News KINGSPORT — This was not a test. Fifty-seven years to the day after a massive explosion and fire at Tennessee Eastman Co.'s Aniline plant killed 16 people and injured more than 400, Eastman Chemical had planned to test its hazardous vapor release alerting system Wednesday. But instead of the simple "acti- vation of Eastman's blue light alert and alarm systems" that was planned, in an odd coinci- dence a real-life "process upset" sent workers to safe havens and sent warnings to the giant plant's neighbors. "The gasifier blew up," an employee and eyewitness work- ing near the explosion told the Times-News. "They just made us run to our car and get out. They told us to get out." Eastman, in a prepared state- ment, explained what happened in an email: "Around 10 a.m., Eastman experienced a process upset in the coal gasification area of its Kingsport manufacturing See OUT, Page 3A Neighbors' concern grew when they saw plumes rise from plant See PLUMES, Page 2A JOHNSON CITY SCHOOLS Officials going school-to-school to find out what you think of the idea HAVE AN OPINION? Turn to Page 3A for a look at proposed configurations for Indian Trail and Liberty Bell and for the scheduled presentation dates and locations. See INPUT, Page 3A The 40th annual Unicoi County Apple Festival will run from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday and Saturday in downtown Erwin. In addition to the vast array of locally grown heir- loom and popular apple varieties the festival revolves around, fun activi - ties to look for include: • Blue Ridge Pottery Show and Sale The 38th annual Blue Ridge Pottery Show and Sale featuring dozens of vendors from across the country will be held from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, at Love Chapel Elementary School on Mohawk Drive. Shuttle service to and from the festival area will be available at the Clinchfield Senior Adult Center on Union Street. Admission is free. A preview sale with a $5 admission fee will be held from 5 p.m.-8 p.m. tonight at the school. Carrying on a regional tradition four decades old and more popular now than when they first took root in the 1970s, the National Storytelling Festival and Unicoi County Apple Festival return to the streets of Jonesborough and Erwin this weekend. The National Storytelling Festival kicks off Friday and wraps up Sunday, but there are still several pre-festival events shaking up the week before the fes- tivities in addition to a weekend packed with the best in storytelling. Festival lineups include: • Featured storytellers Nineteen featured story- tellers from around the world will line the program for the weekend. Listeners can sit in on festival favor- ites like Donald Davis and Jeanne Robertson and check out some of the new voices this year. New voices include Oba William King, who uses song and drum in his storytelling, and Anne Shimojima, who weaves her Asian heritage into her presentations like folk tales and the story of her Japanese American family's time in an incarceration camp during World War II. • Workshops for aspiring tellers Three workshops If your taste is for apples or tales, this is your time of year By sue Guinn LeGG Press Staff Writer slegg@johnsoncitypress.com By Jessica fuLLer Press Staff Writer jfuller@johnsoncitypress.com Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Johnson City Press TRI-CITIES, TENNESSEE | johnsoncitypress.com THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2018 | $1.00 Study: Business costs down, home rates up. A7 Senior smash Boone boys, girls use 'D' to demolish Volunteer on Senior Night. B1 HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL TVA GOOD MORNING Thursday October 5, 2017 Volume 97 - No. 37 johnsoncitypress.com Tri-Cities, Tennessee $1.00 Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B After Johnson City Board of Education members voted unanimously last month to continue studying a pro- posed transition from the current configuration of Indian Trail Intermediate School and Liberty Bell Middle School, the board wants feedback from the community. The board is considering turning each school into a middle school for students grades 5 through 8, which Superintendent Steve Barn- ett said could be beneficial City wants input on plans for two middle schools Falling student rolls 'They told us to get out' By Brandon Paykamian Press Staff Writer bpaykamian@johnsoncitypress.com Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B Eastman 'process upset' shakes neighbors, sends workers to shelter Kingsport Times-News Plumes rise from Wednesday's "pro- cess upset" at Eastman Chemical Co. By Jeff BoBo Kingsport Times-News KINGSPORT — Initially, Miranda Wood thought someone had crashed a vehicle into Johnny's Shoe Store on Eastman Road where she was working Wednesday morning, just a stone's throw from the Eastman Chemical Co. plant. In fact, the plant had been shaken Wednesday morning by explosions in the gasification area that were described by Eastman as "process upsets." When Wood realized what had really happened, she was quite upset indeed. "I heard two explosions, but it really sounded like somebody just hit the (Johnny's) building," Wood said. "My whole chair really did shake. ... As I came downstairs, it did smell like something was burning." Then she and other employees saw the plumes of smoke rising from the Eastman plant and they realized something serious had happened. "You better hold your breath," By Hank Hayes Kingsport Times-News KINGSPORT — This was not a test. Fifty-seven years to the day after a massive explosion and fire at Tennessee Eastman Co.'s Aniline plant killed 16 people and injured more than 400, Eastman Chemical had planned to test its hazardous vapor release alerting system Wednesday. But instead of the simple "acti- vation of Eastman's blue light alert and alarm systems" that was planned, in an odd coinci- dence a real-life "process upset" sent workers to safe havens and sent warnings to the giant plant's neighbors. "The gasifier blew up," an employee and eyewitness work- ing near the explosion told the Times-News. "They just made us run to our car and get out. They told us to get out." Eastman, in a prepared state- ment, explained what happened in an email: "Around 10 a.m., Eastman experienced a process upset in the coal gasification area of its Kingsport manufacturing See OUT, Page 3A Neighbors' concern grew when they saw plumes rise from plant See PLUMES, Page 2A JOHNSON CITY SCHOOLS Officials going school-to-school to find out what you think of the idea HAVE AN OPINION? Turn to Page 3A for a look at proposed configurations for Indian Trail and Liberty Bell and for the scheduled presentation dates and locations. See INPUT, Page 3A The 40th annual Unicoi County Apple Festival will run from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday and Saturday in downtown Erwin. In addition to the vast array of locally grown heir- loom and popular apple varieties the festival revolves around, fun activi - ties to look for include: • Blue Ridge Pottery Show and Sale The 38th annual Blue Ridge Pottery Show and Sale featuring dozens of vendors from across the country will be held from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, at Love Chapel Elementary School on Mohawk Drive. Shuttle service to and from the festival area will be available at the Clinchfield Senior Adult Center on Union Street. Admission is free. A preview sale with a $5 admission fee will be held from 5 p.m.-8 p.m. tonight the school. Carrying on a regional tradition four decades old and more popular now than when they first took root in the 1970s, the National Storytelling Festival and Unicoi County Apple Festival return to the streets of Jonesborough and Erwin this weekend. The National Storytelling Festival kicks off Friday and wraps up Sunday, but there are still several pre-festival events shaking up the week before the fes- tivities in addition to a weekend packed with the best in storytelling. Festival lineups include: • Featured storytellers Nineteen featured story- tellers from around the world will line the program for the weekend. Listeners can sit in on festival favor- ites like Donald Davis and Jeanne Robertson and check out some of the new voices this year. New voices include Oba William King, who uses song and drum in his storytelling, and Anne Shimojima, who weaves her Asian heritage into her presentations like folk tales and the story of her Japanese American family's time in an incarceration camp during World War II. • Workshops for aspiring tellers If your taste is for apples or tales, this is your time of year By sue Guinn LeGG Press Staff Writer slegg@johnsoncitypress.com By Jessica fuLLer Press Staff Writer jfuller@johnsoncitypress.com Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A GOOD MORNING Thursday October 5, 2017 Volume 97 - No. 37 johnsoncitypress.com Tri-Cities, Tennessee $1.00 Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B After Johnson City Board of Education members voted unanimously last month to continue studying a pro- posed transition from the current configuration of Indian Trail Intermediate School and Liberty Bell Middle School, the board wants feedback from the community. The board is considering turning each school into a middle school for students grades 5 through 8, which Superintendent Steve Barn- ett said could be beneficial City wants input on plans for two middle schools Falling student rolls 'They told us to get out' By Brandon Paykamian Press Staff Writer bpaykamian@johnsoncitypress.com Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B Eastman 'process upset' shakes neighbors, sends workers to shelter Kingsport Times-News Plumes rise from Wednesday's "pro- cess upset" at Eastman Chemical Co. By Jeff BoBo Kingsport Times-News KINGSPORT — Initially, Miranda Wood thought someone had crashed a vehicle into Johnny's Shoe Store on Eastman Road where she was working Wednesday morning, just a stone's throw from the Eastman Chemical Co. plant. In fact, the plant had been shaken Wednesday morning by explosions in the gasification area that were described by Eastman as "process upsets." When Wood realized what had really happened, she was quite upset indeed. "I heard two explosions, but it really sounded like somebody just hit the (Johnny's) building," Wood said. "My whole chair really did shake. ... As I came downstairs, it did smell like something was burning." Then she and other employees saw the plumes of smoke rising from the Eastman plant and they realized something serious had happened. "You better hold your breath," By Hank Hayes Kingsport Times-News KINGSPORT — This was not a test. Fifty-seven years to the day after a massive explosion and fire at Tennessee Eastman Co.'s Aniline plant killed 16 people and injured more than 400, Eastman Chemical had planned to test its hazardous vapor release alerting system Wednesday. But instead of the simple "acti- vation of Eastman's blue light alert and alarm systems" that was planned, in an odd coinci- dence a real-life "process upset" sent workers to safe havens and sent warnings to the giant plant's neighbors. "The gasifier blew up," an employee and eyewitness work- ing near the explosion told the Times-News. "They just made us run to our car and get out. They told us to get out." Eastman, in a prepared state- ment, explained what happened in an email: "Around 10 a.m., Eastman experienced a process upset in the coal gasification area of its Kingsport manufacturing See OUT, Page 3A Neighbors' concern grew when they saw plumes rise from plant See PLUMES, Page 2A JOHNSON CITY SCHOOLS Officials going school-to-school to find out what you think of the idea HAVE AN OPINION? Turn to Page 3A for a look at proposed configurations for Indian Trail and Liberty Bell and for the scheduled presentation dates and locations. See INPUT, Page 3A The 40th annual Unicoi County Apple Festival will run from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday and Saturday in downtown Erwin. In addition to the vast array of locally grown heir- loom and popular apple varieties the festival revolves around, fun activi - ties to look for include: • Blue Ridge Pottery Show and Sale The 38th annual Blue Ridge Pottery Show and Sale featuring dozens of vendors from across the country will be held from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, at Love Chapel Elementary School on Mohawk Drive. Shuttle service to and from the festival area will be available at the Clinchfield Senior Adult Center on Union Street. Admission is free. A preview sale with a $5 admission fee will be held from 5 Carrying on a regional tradition four decades old and more popular now than when they first took root in the 1970s, the National Storytelling Festival and Unicoi County Apple Festival return to the streets of Jonesborough and Erwin this weekend. The National Storytelling Festival kicks off Friday and wraps up Sunday, but there are still several pre-festival events shaking up the week before the fes- tivities in addition to a weekend packed with the best in storytelling. Festival lineups include: • Featured storytellers Nineteen featured story- tellers from around the world will line the program for the weekend. Listeners can sit in on festival favor- ites like Donald Davis and Jeanne Robertson and check out some of the new voices this year. New voices include Oba William King, who uses song and drum in his storytelling, and Anne Shimojima, who weaves her Asian heritage into her presentations like folk tales and the story of her Japanese American family's time in an incarceration camp during World War II. Workshops for If your taste is for apples or tales, this is your time of year By sue Guinn LeGG Press Staff Writer slegg@johnsoncitypress.com By Jessica fuLLer Press Staff Writer jfuller@johnsoncitypress.com Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A GOOD MORNING Thursday October 5, 2017 Volume 97 - No. 37 johnsoncitypress.com Tri-Cities, Tennessee $1.00 Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B After Johnson City Board of Education members voted unanimously last month to continue studying a pro- posed transition from the current configuration of Indian Trail Intermediate School and Liberty Bell Middle School, the board wants feedback from the community. The board is considering turning each school into a middle school for students grades 5 through 8, which Superintendent Steve Barn- ett said could be beneficial City wants input on plans for two middle schools Falling student rolls call to study 'They told us to get out' By Brandon Paykamian Press Staff Writer bpaykamian@johnsoncitypress.com Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B Eastman 'process upset' shakes neighbors, sends workers to shelter Kingsport Times-News Plumes rise from Wednesday's "pro- cess upset" at Eastman Chemical Co. By Jeff BoBo Kingsport Times-News KINGSPORT — Initially, Miranda Wood thought someone had crashed a vehicle into Johnny's Shoe Store on Eastman Road where she was working Wednesday morning, just a stone's throw from the Eastman Chemical Co. plant. In fact, the plant had been shaken Wednesday morning by explosions in the gasification area that were described by Eastman as "process upsets." When Wood realized what had really happened, she was quite upset indeed. "I heard two explosions, but it really sounded like somebody just hit the (Johnny's) building," Wood said. "My whole chair really did shake. ... As I came downstairs, it did smell like something was burning." Then she and other employees saw the plumes of smoke rising from the Eastman plant and they realized something serious had happened. "You better hold your breath," By Hank Hayes Kingsport Times-News KINGSPORT — This was not a test. Fifty-seven years to the day after a massive explosion and fire at Tennessee Eastman Co.'s Aniline plant killed 16 people and injured more than 400, Eastman Chemical had planned to test its hazardous vapor release alerting system Wednesday. But instead of the simple "acti- vation of Eastman's blue light alert and alarm systems" that was planned, in an odd coinci- dence a real-life "process upset" sent workers to safe havens and sent warnings to the giant plant's neighbors. "The gasifier blew up," an employee and eyewitness work- ing near the explosion told the Times-News. "They just made us run to our car and get out. They told us to get out." Eastman, in a prepared state- ment, explained what happened in an email: "Around 10 a.m., Eastman experienced a process upset in the coal gasification area of its Kingsport manufacturing See OUT, Page 3A Neighbors' concern grew when they saw plumes rise from plant See PLUMES, Page 2A JOHNSON CITY SCHOOLS Officials going school-to-school to find out what you think of the idea HAVE AN OPINION? Turn to Page 3A for a look at proposed configurations for Indian Trail and Liberty Bell and for the scheduled presentation dates and locations. See INPUT, Page 3A The 40th annual Unicoi County Apple Festival will run from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday and Saturday in downtown Erwin. In addition to the vast array of locally grown heir- loom and popular apple varieties the festival revolves around, fun activi - ties to look for include: • Blue Ridge Pottery Show and Sale The 38th annual Blue Ridge Pottery Show and Sale featuring dozens of vendors from across the country will be held from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, at Love Chapel Elementary School on Mohawk Drive. Shuttle service to and from the festival area will be available at the Clinchfield Senior Adult Center on Union Street. Admission is free. A preview sale with a $5 admission fee will be held from 5 p.m.-8 p.m. tonight at the school. Carrying on a regional tradition four decades old and more popular now than when they first took root in the 1970s, the National Storytelling Festival and Unicoi County Apple Festival return to the streets of Jonesborough and Erwin this weekend. The National Storytelling Festival kicks off Friday and wraps up Sunday, but there are still several pre-festival events shaking up the week before the fes- tivities in addition to a weekend packed with the best in storytelling. Festival lineups include: • Featured storytellers Nineteen featured story- tellers from around the world will line the program for the weekend. Listeners can sit in on festival favor- ites like Donald Davis and Jeanne Robertson and check out some of the new voices this year. New voices include Oba William King, who uses song and drum in his storytelling, and Anne Shimojima, who weaves her Asian heritage into her presentations like folk tales and the story of her Japanese American family's time in an incarceration camp during World War II. • Workshops for aspiring tellers Three workshops for If your taste is for apples or tales, this is your time of year By sue Guinn LeGG Press Staff Writer slegg@johnsoncitypress.com By Jessica fuLLer Press Staff Writer jfuller@johnsoncitypress.com Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Finally MOUNTAIN STATES-WELLMONT MERGER Fundraiser will assist Carter Co. deputy facing trial Black History Month: Time to restore lost knowledge As Black History Month, February is a time to discuss black history in a society where American history is often told mainly from a white perspective. Tennessee's final COPA approval paves way for merger, creation of Ballad Health How did we get here? The path that led to the creation of Ballad Health began Jan. 9, 2014, when Wellmont Health System announced it would search for partner. Turn to Page A2 to follow the journey to Wednesday's announcement. County candidates? 72 so far CONTRIBUTED/MOUNTAIN STATES HEALTH ALLIANCE Wednesday's announcement was the final step in the process of getting the Ballad Health merger approved. A spokesperson for Mountain States said, "We're excited to take the next steps together as Ballad Health." Tennessee Department of Health Commissioner John Dreyzehner announced Wednesday that Mountain States Health Alliance and Wellmont Health System were officially granted a Certificate of Public Advantage, permit - ting the two entities to merge into Ballad Health. "Clearly a great deal of work on the part of all involved has gone into this groundbreaking result. We can be proud of the thoughtful, deliberate, trans- parent and community-ac- countable process it has been, one I know we all look forward to continuing," Dreyzehner said in a press release. "Our job as the state was to determine whether a merger of the two systems could create a clear public benefit to the people of this wonderful and vibrant region, a responsibility we took and will continue to take very seriously as we enter this next exciting and important phase." Release of more Ballad launch information expected today See BALLAD, Page A2 Hopkins charged with second-degree murder in North Carolina case See DEPUTY, Page A2 By John Thompson ELIZABETHTON BUREAU CHIEF jthompson@johnsoncitypress.com Pair say it's about more than studying a handful of renowned figures By Brandon Paykamian PRESS STAFF WRITER bpaykamian@johnsoncitypress.com By Zach Vance PRESS STAFF WRITER zvance@johnsoncitypress.com April 21, 2017 75 Cents 101st Year, Number 111 FRIDAY Tennessee teen, teacher found in California — Page 5B Safe and sound ADLER BEGLEY COOPER DUNCAN CROSS GEORGE PARHAM VICARS WILLIAMS ELLIS Kingsport candidates weigh in on city-county relations First in a series while two candidates are facing off for the remaining two-year until the election, decided not to run. The Times-News asked a se - the Jennifer Adler The well-being of Kingsport is vital to Sullivan County and vice versa, especially from an From tion and commitment to mutual improvement. That said, I do continue to hear questions from citizens about the relationship between particular- By RAIN SMITH rsmith@timesnews.net KINGSPORT — Follow- ing an extensive overnight search that resumed Thurs- day morning, a 67-year-old man was located after spend- ing the night in the woods at Bays Mountain Park. Authorities report that Donald Pierson appeared to be well and was transport- ed to an area hospital for an evaluation. Kingsport Fire Department Public Educa- tion Officer Barry Brick- ey says that Pierson was found at ap- proximately 10:40 a.m. at the wolf hab- itat, after he followed a trail out of the woods. According to Kingsport police, Pierson apparently Rain Smith — rsmith@timesnews.net About 40 rescue personnel joined in a grid search late Wednesday and early Thursday for Donald Pierson, 67, after he apparently became disoriented and got lost at Bays Mountain Park. A Tennessee Highway Pa- trol helicopter also assisted in the search overnight. PIERSON 67-year-old located after spending night in woods on Bays Mountain See SEARCH, 6A By NICK SHEPHERD nshepherd@timesnews.net YUMA — Students from Yuma Elementary lined both sides of the entrance to the school while eagerly holding posters and watching every passing car. They let out a scream, which turned into a dull roar, when they finally saw him. The Ginja Ninja was in town and every single ' As ninjas, one of the big things we want to do ... is spread fitness. And you have to start with the kids. ' — Chris Boehm (The Ginja Ninja) Nick Shepherd — nshepherd@timesnews.net 'American Ninja Warrior' finalist Chris Boehm, known as the Ginja Ninja, speaks to a rapt audience Thursday at Yuma Elementary. Boehm, who is from Nashville, was greeted like a rock star when he arrived at the school, below. Perfect fit 'American Ninja Warrior' finalist promotes fitness in Yuma visit Nick Shepherd — nshepherd@timesnews.net See NINJA, 6A J.H. Osborne — josborne@timesnews.net Among those who did show up to talk with the public Thursday night were David Wilson (standing, in blue shirt), of Mat- tern & Craig, who tried to explain what the firm is doing to help Bluff City resolve its sewage problems, and two representatives of the USDA's Rural Development Office (seated at table facing the audience). Empty chairs greet residents at Bluff City sewer meeting By J.H. OSBORNE josborne@timesnews.net JOHNSON CITY — About 40 people turned out Thursday for a "public forum" about Bluff City's sewage overflow prob- lems. The Boone Lake Association and the Tennessee Clean Water Network or- ganized and hosted the event, which they had promoted as an attempt to assemble all the parties involved in the city's on- going attempt to address the issue — to hopefully gain definitive answers for the public. On multiple occasions over the past cou- ple of years, Bluff City's sewage system has overflowed, running through homeowners' properties and into Boone Lake. Multiple property owners have claimed their homes have been damaged to varying degrees. Throughout the forum on Thursday, Boone Lake Association members said they regularly test the lake's water, and other than at locations near the actual overflow in Bluff City, they hadn't found anything to alarm the public regarding wa- ter quality or safety. Bluff City's problem in a nutshell is an aging sewer system that isn't designed or See EMPTY, 6A GOOD MORNING Thursday October 5, 2017 Volume 97 - No. 37 johnsoncitypress.com Tri-Cities, Tennessee $1.00 Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B After Johnson City Board of Education members voted unanimously last month to continue studying a pro- posed transition from the current configuration of Indian Trail Intermediate School and Liberty Bell Middle School, the board wants feedback from the community. The board is considering turning each school into a middle school for students grades 5 through 8, which Superintendent Steve Barn- ett said could be beneficial City wants input on plans for two middle schools Falling student rolls bring call to study 'They told us to get out' By Brandon Paykamian Press Staff Writer bpaykamian@johnsoncitypress.com Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B Eastman 'process upset' shakes neighbors, sends workers to shelter Kingsport Times-News Plumes rise from Wednesday's "pro- cess upset" at Eastman Chemical Co. By Jeff BoBo Kingsport Times-News KINGSPORT — Initially, Miranda Wood thought someone had crashed a vehicle into Johnny's Shoe Store on Eastman Road where she was working Wednesday morning, just a stone's throw from the Eastman Chemical Co. plant. In fact, the plant had been shaken Wednesday morning by explosions in the gasification area that were described by Eastman as "process upsets." When Wood realized what had really happened, she was quite upset indeed. "I heard two explosions, but it really sounded like somebody just hit the (Johnny's) building," Wood said. "My whole chair really did shake. ... As I came downstairs, it did smell like something was burning." Then she and other employees saw the plumes of smoke rising from the Eastman plant and they realized something serious had happened. "You better hold your breath," By Hank Hayes Kingsport Times-News KINGSPORT — This was not a test. Fifty-seven years to the day after a massive explosion and fire at Tennessee Eastman Co.'s Aniline plant killed 16 people and injured more than 400, Eastman Chemical had planned to test its hazardous vapor release alerting system Wednesday. But instead of the simple "acti- vation of Eastman's blue light alert and alarm systems" that was planned, in an odd coinci- dence a real-life "process upset" sent workers to safe havens and sent warnings to the giant plant's neighbors. "The gasifier blew up," an employee and eyewitness work- ing near the explosion told the Times-News. "They just made us run to our car and get out. They told us to get out." Eastman, in a prepared state- ment, explained what happened in an email: "Around 10 a.m., Eastman experienced a process upset in the coal gasification area of its Kingsport manufacturing See OUT, Page 3A Neighbors' concern grew when they saw plumes rise from plant See PLUMES, Page 2A JOHNSON CITY SCHOOLS Officials going school-to-school to find out what you think of the idea HAVE AN OPINION? Turn to Page 3A for a look at proposed configurations for Indian Trail and Liberty Bell and for the scheduled presentation dates and locations. See INPUT, Page 3A The 40th annual Unicoi County Apple Festival will run from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday and Saturday in downtown Erwin. In addition to the vast array of locally grown heir- loom and popular apple varieties the festival revolves around, fun activi- ties to look for include: • Blue Ridge Pottery Show and Sale The 38th annual Blue Ridge Pottery Show and Sale featuring dozens of vendors from across the country will be held from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, at Love Chapel Elementary School on Mohawk Drive. Shuttle service to and from the festival area will be available at the Clinchfield Senior Adult Center on Union Street. Admission is free. A preview sale with a $5 admission fee will be held from 5 p.m.-8 p.m. tonight at the school. • Live Carrying on a regional tradition four decades old and more popular now than when they first took root in the 1970s, the National Storytelling Festival and Unicoi County Apple Festival return to the streets of Jonesborough and Erwin this weekend. The National Storytelling Festival kicks off Friday and wraps up Sunday, but there are still several pre-festival events shaking up the week before the fes- tivities in addition to a weekend packed with the best in storytelling. Festival lineups include: • Featured storytellers Nineteen featured story- tellers from around the world will line the program for the weekend. Listeners can sit in on festival favor- ites like Donald Davis and Jeanne Robertson and check out some of the new voices this year. New voices include Oba William King, who uses song and drum in his storytelling, and Anne Shimojima, who weaves her Asian heritage into her presentations like folk tales and the story of her Japanese American family's time in an incarceration camp during World War II. • Workshops for aspiring tellers Three workshops will be held for If your taste is for apples or tales, this is your time of year By sue Guinn LeGG Press Staff Writer slegg@johnsoncitypress.com By Jessica fuLLer Press Staff Writer jfuller@johnsoncitypress.com Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A GOOD MORNING Thursday October 5, 2017 Volume 97 - No. 37 johnsoncitypress.com Tri-Cities, Tennessee $1.00 Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B After Johnson City Board of Education members voted unanimously last month to continue studying a pro- posed transition from the current configuration of Indian Trail Intermediate School and Liberty Bell Middle School, the board wants feedback from the community. The board is considering turning each school into a middle school for students grades 5 through 8, which Superintendent Steve Barn- ett said could be beneficial City wants input on plans for two middle schools Falling student rolls study 'They told us to get out' By Brandon Paykamian Press Staff Writer bpaykamian@johnsoncitypress.com Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B Eastman 'process upset' shakes neighbors, sends workers to shelter Kingsport Times-News Plumes rise from Wednesday's "pro- cess upset" at Eastman Chemical Co. By Jeff BoBo Kingsport Times-News KINGSPORT — Initially, Miranda Wood thought someone had crashed a vehicle into Johnny's Shoe Store on Eastman Road where she was working Wednesday morning, just a stone's throw from the Eastman Chemical Co. plant. In fact, the plant had been shaken Wednesday morning by explosions in the gasification area that were described by Eastman as "process upsets." When Wood realized what had really happened, she was quite upset indeed. "I heard two explosions, but it really sounded like somebody just hit the (Johnny's) building," Wood said. "My whole chair really did shake. ... As I came downstairs, it did smell like something was burning." Then she and other employees saw the plumes of smoke rising from the Eastman plant and they realized something serious had happened. "You better hold your breath," By Hank Hayes Kingsport Times-News KINGSPORT — This was not a test. Fifty-seven years to the day after a massive explosion and fire at Tennessee Eastman Co.'s Aniline plant killed 16 people and injured more than 400, Eastman Chemical had planned to test its hazardous vapor release alerting system Wednesday. But instead of the simple "acti- vation of Eastman's blue light alert and alarm systems" that was planned, in an odd coinci- dence a real-life "process upset" sent workers to safe havens and sent warnings to the giant plant's neighbors. "The gasifier blew up," an employee and eyewitness work- ing near the explosion told the Times-News. "They just made us run to our car and get out. They told us to get out." Eastman, in a prepared state- ment, explained what happened in an email: "Around 10 a.m., Eastman experienced a process upset in the coal gasification area of its Kingsport manufacturing See OUT, Page 3A Neighbors' concern grew when they saw plumes rise from plant See PLUMES, Page 2A JOHNSON CITY SCHOOLS Officials going school-to-school to find out what you think of the idea HAVE AN OPINION? Turn to Page 3A for a look at proposed configurations for Indian Trail and Liberty Bell and for the scheduled presentation dates and locations. See INPUT, Page 3A The 40th annual Unicoi County Apple Festival will run from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday and Saturday in downtown Erwin. In addition to the vast array of locally grown heir- loom and popular apple varieties the festival revolves around, fun activi- ties to look for include: • Blue Ridge Pottery Show and Sale The 38th annual Blue Ridge Pottery Show and Sale featuring dozens of vendors from across the country will be held from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, at Love Chapel Elementary School on Mohawk Drive. Shuttle service to and from the festival area will be available at the Clinchfield Senior Adult Center on Union Street. Admission is free. A preview sale with a $5 admission fee will be held from 5 p.m.-8 p.m. tonight at the school. Carrying on a regional tradition four decades old and more popular now than when they first took root in the 1970s, the National Storytelling Festival and Unicoi County Apple Festival return to the streets of Jonesborough and Erwin this weekend. The National Storytelling Festival kicks off Friday and wraps up Sunday, but there are still several pre-festival events shaking up the week before the fes- tivities in addition to a weekend packed with the best in storytelling. Festival lineups include: • Featured storytellers Nineteen featured story- tellers from around the world will line the program for the weekend. Listeners can sit in on festival favor- ites like Donald Davis and Jeanne Robertson and check out some of the new voices this year. New voices include Oba William King, who uses song and drum in his storytelling, and Anne Shimojima, who weaves her Asian heritage into her presentations like folk tales and the story of her Japanese American family's time in an incarceration camp during World War II. • Workshops for aspiring tellers workshops If your taste is for apples or tales, this is your time of year By sue Guinn LeGG Press Staff Writer slegg@johnsoncitypress.com By Jessica fuLLer Press Staff Writer jfuller@johnsoncitypress.com Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A GOOD MORNING Thursday October 5, 2017 Volume 97 - No. 37 johnsoncitypress.com Tri-Cities, Tennessee $1.00 Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B After Johnson City Board of Education members voted unanimously last month to continue studying a pro- posed transition from the current configuration of Indian Trail Intermediate School and Liberty Bell Middle School, the board wants feedback from the community. The board is considering turning each school into a middle school for students grades 5 through 8, which Superintendent Steve Barn- ett said could be beneficial City wants input on plans for two middle schools Falling student rolls bring call to study 'They told us to get out' By Brandon Paykamian Press Staff Writer bpaykamian@johnsoncitypress.com Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B Surprise? Longhorns expected football success/1B Eastman 'process upset' shakes neighbors, sends workers to shelter Kingsport Times-News Plumes rise from Wednesday's "pro- cess upset" at Eastman Chemical Co. By Jeff BoBo Kingsport Times-News KINGSPORT — Initially, Miranda Wood thought someone had crashed a vehicle into Johnny's Shoe Store on Eastman Road where she was working Wednesday morning, just a stone's throw from the Eastman Chemical Co. plant. In fact, the plant had been shaken Wednesday morning by explosions in the gasification area that were described by Eastman as "process upsets." When Wood realized what had really happened, she was quite upset indeed. "I heard two explosions, but it really sounded like somebody just hit the (Johnny's) building," Wood said. "My whole chair really did shake. ... As I came downstairs, it did smell like something was burning." Then she and other employees saw the plumes of smoke rising from the Eastman plant and they realized something serious had happened. "You better hold your breath," By Hank Hayes Kingsport Times-News KINGSPORT — This was not a test. Fifty-seven years to the day after a massive explosion and fire at Tennessee Eastman Co.'s Aniline plant killed 16 people and injured more than 400, Eastman Chemical had planned to test its hazardous vapor release alerting system Wednesday. But instead of the simple "acti- vation of Eastman's blue light alert and alarm systems" that was planned, in an odd coinci- dence a real-life "process upset" sent workers to safe havens and sent warnings to the giant plant's neighbors. "The gasifier blew up," an employee and eyewitness work- ing near the explosion told the Times-News. "They just made us run to our car and get out. They told us to get out." Eastman, in a prepared state- ment, explained what happened in an email: "Around 10 a.m., Eastman experienced a process upset in the coal gasification area of its Kingsport manufacturing See OUT, Page 3A Neighbors' concern grew when they saw plumes rise from plant See PLUMES, Page 2A JOHNSON CITY SCHOOLS Officials going school-to-school to find out what you think of the idea HAVE AN OPINION? Turn to Page 3A for a look proposed configurations Indian Trail and Liberty Bell for the scheduled presentation dates and locations. See INPUT, Page 3A The 40th annual Unicoi County Apple Festival will run from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday and Saturday in downtown Erwin. In addition to the vast array of locally grown heir- loom and popular apple varieties the festival revolves around, fun activi- ties to look for include: • Blue Ridge Pottery Show and Sale The 38th annual Blue Ridge Pottery Show and Sale featuring dozens of vendors from across the country will be held from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, at Love Chapel Elementary School on Mohawk Drive. Shuttle service to and from the festival area will be available at the Clinchfield Senior Adult Center on Union Street. Admission is free. A preview sale with a $5 admission fee will be held from 5 p.m.-8 p.m. tonight at the school. • Live entertainment on Carrying on a regional tradition four decades old and more popular now than when they first took root in the 1970s, the National Storytelling Festival and Unicoi County Apple Festival return to the streets of Jonesborough and Erwin this weekend. The National Storytelling Festival kicks off Friday and wraps up Sunday, but there are still several pre-festival events shaking up the week before the fes- tivities in addition to a weekend packed with the best in storytelling. Festival lineups include: • Featured storytellers Nineteen featured story- tellers from around the world will line the program for the weekend. Listeners can sit in on festival favor- ites like Donald Davis and Jeanne Robertson and check out some of the new voices this year. New voices include Oba William King, who uses song and drum in his storytelling, and Anne Shimojima, who weaves her Asian heritage into her presentations like folk tales and the story of her Japanese American family's time in an incarceration camp during World War II. • Workshops for aspiring tellers Three workshops will be held for aspiring tellers on night. If your taste is for apples or tales, this is your time of year By sue Guinn LeGG Press Staff Writer slegg@johnsoncitypress.com By Jessica fuLLer Press Staff Writer jfuller@johnsoncitypress.com Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Power play ETSU's Power set for return to Tour/1B Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A Ready for guests Sabine Hill to host tours/4A KINGSPORT, TENNESSEE | timesnews.net WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 31, 2018 | $1.00 TimesNews YOUR LOCAL NEWS FOR MORE THAN 100 YEARS Got a great soup recipe? The Great Winter Soup Cook Off needs you. 12B Public invited to conservation events at Warriors Path. 6A Colonial Heights residents question 'completeness' of city's plan of services By MATTHEW LANE mlane@timesnews.net KINGSPORT — Kingsport offi- cials recently announced that the plan of services for the Colonial Heights annexation area had been completed and done so by the deadline. However, that doesn't neces- sarily mean all of the work in Colonial Heights is done. Nor does it mean that everyone is hooked Teen faces 34 counts in poaching investigation By JEFF BOBO jbobo@timesnews.net ROGERSVILLE — A Hawkins County teen who was arrested in Hancock County last month accused of spotlighting deer from a vehicle was formally charged Monday in Hawkins County with 34 counts related to more alleged illegal hunting and spotlighting. Christian Thomas Churchwell, 18, 327 Collins St., Church Hill, was charged in Hawkins County on Monday with 11 counts of spotlighting deer, three counts of unlawful hunting of big game, two counts of hunting big game out of season, eight counts of hunting from a motor vehicle on a public road, six counts of illegal possession of big game and four counts of taking over the limit. During his investigation, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency Officer Christopher Seay reportedly utilized witness state- ments from accused poachers, as well as text messages, videos and photos from Churchwell's phone. Seay also reportedly seized six white tail deer heads, two from Churchwell and four from one of Churchwell Drug roundup targets 80 in Wise A work in progress? By STEPHEN IGO sigo@timesnews.net WISE — Law enforcement authorities launched a roundup of alleged drug offenders in Wise County on Tuesday targeting 80 individuals. Wise County Commonwealth's Attorney Chuck Slemp and Sheriff Ronnie Oakes announced 111 indictments by the multi-ju- risdictional grand jury charging more than 200 drug-related offenses such as distribution, possession and manufacturing, prescription fraud, child abuse and neglect, contributing to the delinquency of a child, and dis- tribution of narcotics within 1,000 feet of a school. Slemp and Oakes said the roundup of offenders stems from extensive investigations by the Southwest Virginia Regional Drug Task Force involving illicit drug activity in the county and the city of Norton. Other law enforcement agen- cies involved in the roundup, dubbed "Operation Frostbite," include the police departments of Coeburn, Wise, Pound and Big Stone Gap, the Virginia Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control and the Virginia State Police. "Over the course of the past several months, our office has been working closely with law enforcement in an effort to eradi- cate drug-related crime in our region, and today's operation is a CONTRIBUTED / BRIAN CASTLE Contractors were recently working at a pump station near the Chesterfield neighborhood in Colonial Heights. Kingsport Assistant City Manager Ryan McReynolds said that there was an issue with the sewer line going into the pump station and that contractors were working to fix the problem. 'New American moment' By JULIE PACE AND ZEKE MILLER Associated Press WASHINGTON — Addressing a deeply divided nation, President Donald Trump called for a "new American moment" of unity Tuesday night and challenged law- makers to make good on long- standing promises to fix a danger- ously fractured immigration system, warning of evil outside forces seeking to undermine the nation's way of life. Trump's State of the Union address blended self-congratulation and calls for optimism amid a growing economy with dark warn- ings about deadly gangs, the scourge of drugs and violent immigrants living in the United States illegally. He cast the debate over immigration — an issue that has long animated his most ardent supporters — as a battle between heroes and villains, praising the work of an immigration agent who arrested more than 100 gang members and saluting the fam- ilies of two alleged gang victims. He also spoke forebodingly of cata- strophic dangers from abroad, warning that North Korea would "very soon" threaten the United States with nuclear-tipped missiles. "The United States is a compas- sionate nation. We are proud that we do more than any other country to help the needy, the struggling and the underprivileged all over the world," Trump said. "But as presi- dent of the United States, my highest loyalty, my greatest compassion, and my constant concern is for America's children, America's struggling workers and America's forgotten communities." Trump spoke with tensions run- ning high on Capitol Hill. An impasse over immigration prompted a three-day government shutdown earlier this year, and law- makers appear no closer to resolving the status of the "Dreamers" — young people living in the U.S. ille- gally — ahead of a new Feb. 8 dead- line for funding operations. The par- ties have also clashed this week over the plans of Republicans on the House intelligence committee to release a classified memo on the Russia investigation involving Trump's presidential campaign — a decision the White House backs but Trump calls for unity in State of the Union address WIN MCNAMEE / VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS President Donald Trump claps during the State of the Union address in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol Tuesday night in Washington. 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